It is All in Your Mind


It is important, if not ironic, for people suffering from MS related cognitive issues to remain aware that not everyone has their best interests in mind. This is true for all people in general.  However, the very nature of MS probably dictates a need for some level of help from others.  Understandably worrisome but does worry combined with MS naturally lead to depression?

soccerballsAs presented by Neil Cavuto on 16 June 2014, “One out of three of us is bummed-out and do [sic] not think things will get better.” Granted, he was not speaking specifically about multiple sclerosis (even given the fact he has MS) but it certainly applies.  He was talking about all people all over the world and it naturally made me wonder about those of us with multiple sclerosis. Are we more or just as or less depressed (“bummed out”) than the general population?

According to Allison Shadday, LCSW, “Over the course of a lifetime, the prevalence of experiencing a depressive disorder may reach to nearly one in five for women, and one in eight for men – and some sources give even higher estimates.

Despite being a fairly common condition, depression is still a widely misunderstood and ‘stigmatized’ disorder . . .” [Source: Multiple Sclerosis Association of America publication “Understanding and Treating Depression in Multiple Sclerosis.”]

Depression related to a chronic condition is sadly considered normal and seemingly accepted as inevitable.

It is probable that many MS patients when asked by their neurologist if they were depressed have said, “Heck yes! I have MS! Am I depressed every minute or even most of the time? No. But I am depressed for minutes or even an entire day; you know, for short periods.”

The bigger problem is lasting depression. “Facing a chronic illness naturally leads to feelings of uncertainty, grief, sadness, anger or fear. But when these feelings continue and disrupt quality of life and day-to-day functioning, depression may be the culprit.” [Source: National Alliance on Mental Illness fact sheet “Depression and Chronic Illness.”]  This is one of the major reasons why it is important for us men with MS to get out of the house and socialize with other men: other men with MS. Men who actually know what we are going through without hearing us say much at all because they are experiencing or have experienced it.

Yes, 70/Four70 IS a support group but it, along with the Denver MS Men’s Group, is not a run-of-the-mill support group. We males do not deal with our MS as do females. That is neither positive nor negative; rather it is a reality. The male approach is hard to describe, but as one of our members succinctly put it: “No whining.”

As stated in the immediately preceding posting, “If nothing else, men do not like to show vulnerability or be perceived as weak.” But we do “want to know ‘what can be done . . .’

 

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